Tag Archives: women

What to feed women in your Red Tent

Are you starting your first Red Tent? Should you have food or not have food? Not sure what to feed the women? Do you want something hearty, but also gluten-free, dairy-free, vegetarian, and vegan? We have the perfect recipe for you… Red Tent Cashew Chili. In this Red Tent TV video Dr. Isadora (who happens to be a great cook) shares a recipe that women LOVE & that she uses in her Red Tent.


If you liked this video, subscribe to our channel & sign up for our free weekly episodes of Red Tent TV at http://www.redtent.tv/

Missed my most recent episodes? Watch them here:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmZGBmANkmSBD1337JiQWbw

Enjoy the video and have a fantastic day! Thanks for watching!

My YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmZGBmANkmSBD1337JiQWbw
Website: http://www.redtent.tv
Friendship on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/redtentfilm

Music: “Women of Today” by Faith Rivera of Lil’ Girl Creations & Beth Eichel Productions http://www.FaithRivera.com and http://www.BethEichelProductions.com

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Filed under From the filmmaker, how to create a Red Tent, Isadora Gabrielle Leidenfrost, red tent, Red Tent TV

How to Promote your Red Tent

by Isadora Gabrielle Leidenfrost, PhD

There are many ways to get the word out about your Red Tent. We believe that women will feel compelled to attend if it feels relevant, important and timely, and if it speaks to them. At any given time there will be many possible tie-ins to women’s lives and “hooks” for particular media outlets. Because a Red Tent is a woman-only space, your primary audience will be women. While we suggest that you start by inviting your girlfriends and female family members, we also want to encourage you to consider opening the flaps of your tent a little wider.

[youtube+https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zxbo-6kisyg]

Let’s say that you already have 10 girlfriends that you know will attend. Offer these “inspired” women an opportunity to get involved. For example, maybe they can bring some food, give out some postcards, hang some flyers, send some emails, help with set up or any number of other tasks that they are great at.

Take into account how best to reach your audiences. Not everyone uses e-mail or facebook, and not everyone hangs out at progressive coffee shops. A clear understanding of how to reach each audience segment will make you more effective, and the best strategy is a combination of the ideas listed below.

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Personalized Email

Send an personal email to your friends, family, co-workers (who might be interested), or your email mailing list (business). We have created a email template that you can download. We recommend you send out these emails at least twice: two weeks before, and then a reminder a few days before our event.

Other people you might invite by email:

  • Inivte the owners/organizers of the venue
  • Invite your community leaders
  • Invite other local organizations or women’s groups
  • Invite the press

 

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Facebook Event

Create a Facebook Event & invite your facebook friends. Not sure how, here’s a step-by-step plan for you. (This may have changed depending if Facebook made any recent graphical changes)

1. log into your facebook account2. Go to your facebook page

3. Click the “More” link (currently located next to your # of friends). Scroll down to “Events” & click it

4. Click “Create Event” and follow the on-screen instructions.

If you are needing info for your Facebook Event we suggest that you download the email template and use that same information. And feel free use any photo or drag & drop (or right click) any photo from this website for this promotion.

Be sure to enable the features that allow people to forward your event information to their friends. You can also just send a message with the event information to your friends and to groups that might be interested.

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Local Media

We have designed this list to be comprehensive in order to empower you to do the best Red Tent possible. We realize that some sections will not be applicable to everyone and this section on local media is a great example – depending on your objectives and your audience, you may or may not decide to pursue media coverage. That’s fine, as it’s all about how best to reach and impact your audience. But read on for some guidance for how simple media outreach can be!

We understand that many small groups or community organizations may have limited capacity, so we’ve put together some basic tips that can be useful to those who are new to working with local media. Before you make complicated plans about how to promote your Red Tent, spend some time thinking about who is most likely to understand and appreciate it, and what media our target audience listens to, reads and logs on to. By targeting your core audience of women, you might decide that it makes more sense to focus on, say, an alternative weekly paper that already covers innovative community initiatives vs. the headline-driven daily paper that tends to focus on crime and celebrities.

Below are some basic tips for your media outreach:

Use the template press release as a guide to create your own. Ten days before the event, issue the release to a wide range of mainstream, alternative, community and specialized media. Make sure to send it to reporters covering women’s issues, the arts/entertainment, and metro sections.

Here are a number of ideas:

  • If the Press wants more info about the Red Tent
  • Get on local calendar listings
  • Make calls to local television and radio programs.

Here’s who to contact:

  • Local TV news: assignment editors
  • Public affairs or magazine programs: producers
  • Talk radio or local/community radio: producers or hosts

A couple of days prior to your Red Tent contact the people to whom you sent press materials and encourage them to attend.

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Acknowledgements “Portions of this guide were adapted from the Made in L.A. Event Planning Toolkit, created by the filmmakers of Made in L.A. (www.MadeinLA.com) and based on materials developed by Active Voice (www.activevoice.net) with funding from P.O.V

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Filed under From the filmmaker, how to create a Red Tent, Isadora Gabrielle Leidenfrost, red tent, Red Tent TV, The Red Tent, Video of the Month Clip

My Mother Told Me…

What messages did your mother give you about being a Woman?
What messages are you offering your daughter about being a Woman?
What legacy would you like to pass-on Today’s Girls?

Help me celebrate Mother’s Day! Join us in the virtual “Red Tent” for a special episode of Red Tent TV featuring a provocative conversation with Dr. Isadora & her mother (Teresa Moorehouse) as they give you their answers to the questions above.


This video was originally created for the ‘Red Tents In Every Neighborhood’ 2nd Annual World Summit. The Global Summit’ drew more than 5,000 women from all over the world during February 2015, and featured speakers from the U.S.A, Spain, Germany, U.K, Italy, Ireland, Israel, New Zealand, and Australia. Participants from around the world felt transformed, inspired, and ready to start a Red Tent in their neighborhood – as a result of the summit!

After you’ve watched the episode, I’d love to know…How would you answer the above questions.

If you liked this video, subscribe to our channel & sign up for our free weekly episodes of Red Tent TV at http://www.redtent.tv/

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Filed under "things we don't talk about", coming of age, daughter, DeAnna L'am, From the filmmaker, grandmother, growing up, Isadora Gabrielle Leidenfrost, mother, motherhood, parenting, red tent, red tent film, red tent movie, Red Tent TV, Red Tents in Every Neighborhood

My First Blood Story

by Karen Tinner
I wish that I could say my first blood was an encouraging departure from how menstruation is treated in Western cultures, but sadly, it wasn’t. Rather, it embodied every negative association. I had just turned 11 years old less than a week before, and had never been informed about menstruation. Although I was well-read for an adolescent, I was not yet interested in anything to do with maturation, reproduction or sexuality and no one, either at home or in school, had shared any information with me. Further, although I knew of one or two girls who had “gotten their period,” they were 2-3 years older than me. When I started bleeding, I remember running to my mother and telling her that something was terribly wrong, that I was afraid I was dying. She simply scoffed at me, took me to the bathroom and showed me the sanitary napkins. Still shaken, I remember telling her that I was “too young to go through this,” that I “wasn’t ready,” and that I was “afraid.” All of this fell on deaf ears. There was only the inference that menstruation was a dirty, distasteful fact of a woman’s life, an inconvenient reality to be endured as tidily as possible. The home I grew up in consisted of my mother (born in 1946) and her parents, and as an isolated only child, there were no other women in whom I could confide my feelings. This theme of isolation would be carried over into all of my journey to adult womanhood. Matters of romantic love and sexuality were never addressed, and my isolation was greatly compounded due to my mother and grandmother’s activities in the pseudo-Christian cult of Jehovah’s Witnesses. My grandfather was an emotionally cool, somewhat dictatorial man who demanded respect but never communicated with me with any degree of warmth or positivity. My mother and grandmother lived up to his expectation that women be uncomplaining and subservient. And my father was absent, divorced from my mother due to alcoholism when I was two years of age. Needless to say, I grew up feeling as if being female was an unfortunate accident. In the years since, I have been caregiver to all of my family of origin, saying goodbye to all of them within a five year span (my mother succumbed to terminal cancer in 1997, my grandfather to terminal cancer in 1998 and my grandmother to autoimmune disease in 2002); was married; birthed a son and a daughter; was widowed; remarried; birthed a second daughter; and have returned to school to complete my undergraduate education, switching from English (and Philosophy and Women’s Studies) to Psychology with an eye to obtaining a Master’s in Counseling. All of these experiences have helped me to replace the ambivalence, misogyny and emotional vacancies of my upbringing with healthy, positive and empowered images and narratives. My awareness of and appreciation for the unique emotional, intellectual and physical capacities of women grows with each day, and I am happy to say that I have embraced my good fortune to have been born female! My older daughter has just turned 7 and my younger daughter is 2 1/2. Even before I conceived my older daughter, I resolved to ensure any daughter I might birth would have a very different experience in growing into her womanhood. Both my daughers will be well-prepared to celebrate their first blood. Even now, they are aware that being female is a gift. Further, my son, who is 9, is being raised to appreciate the contributions of women, not least of which is the fact that all man- (and woman-) kind comes into this world by way of a woman’s love and physiology. In part through my children — and also through the career I am preparing for — I hope to make a meaningful contribution in effecting positive change in the way women experience their rites of passage, view themselves and their life experiences, and in the way women and men value one another.

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Filed under blood, coming of age, growing up, menstruation

How to Celebrate Menstruation

How would our world be different if girls were raised to honor their menstrual time? How would our world be different if our girls had some form of celebration when they first began to menstruate. How would your life be different if you were celebrated? Join us in the virtual “Red Tent” for today’s episode of Red Tent TV. After you’ve watched the episode, I’d love to know… How have you celebrated menstruation?

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Filed under ageing, and Hormone Cycle, blood, coming of age, From the filmmaker, growing up, Isadora Gabrielle Leidenfrost, menstruation, menstruation video, Mood, moon, Moon Lodge, mooncycle, parenting, PMS

Our Voices are Returning

When we as women feel lost and far away from our authentic selves, the Red Tent is there to help us open back up to all those parts of our being that have had to shut down in the course of everyday life. We remember what we have been longing to speak, and the words pour forth.

Join us in the virtual “Red Tent” for today’s episode of Red Tent TV.

After you’ve watched the episode, I’d love to know…

How do you find your way back to yourself?

I look forward to reading your comments below.

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Filed under "things we don't talk about", From the filmmaker, red tent, Red Tent TV, Video of the Month Clip

Every community should have one of these…

Even a sixteen-year-old girl knows: our world would benefit immensely from all women having access to sacred spaces where we can be together, listen, teach, and pass on wisdom. It doesn’t matter whether we call them moon lodges, Red Tents, or something else—our instincts tell us how important they are.

Join us in the virtual “Red Tent” for today’s episode of Red Tent TV.

After you’ve watched the episode, I’d love to know…

How would you life be different if you had a Red Tent?

I look forward to reading your comments below.

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Filed under Red Tent TV